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Post pictures of your items and ask questions or just learn from reading the posts from others

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View or upload ads from antique magazines
Bulb & Socket Bases
View images of the most well known bulb and socket bases

Patent Utilities
Patent Linker
Lets You Pull Up Any Patent PDF File Or Link One Directly To Your Web Page
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Lets You Download The First Page Patent Picture Of Every Patent On A Single Day To View On Quickly Your Local Computer
MultiView Search
Lets You Search For Patents Using Advanced Methods And Provides Hyper Links To The Patent Office And Google Patents

I have not had much time to get many items in the forsale area below. Please keep checking back as I will start adding more items soon.

Items For Sale

Cord Balls & Adjusters
NEW - My cord pendant adjuster project, as well as a good history about them.


Switch Material

Electrical Code
Mica Insulation
CP or WATTS Marks
Socket Bead/Rib/UNO
Catalogs & Ads
Patents
Pull Chains / Finials
Socket & Electrical Manufacturer's Items And Their History
GECO Sockets
NEW - This section will allow you to date and learn how to tell one GECO socket from the other.
Hubbell

This is where this site started from. Since this page was done, there has been much more Hubbell history and information found which will make for a complete redesign of this page and section in the soon future.
Hubbell Patents
This section has some early patent research on Hubbell. It is mostly complete with only a few missing patents which will be added in when this section is re done into the new format
Wheeler Reflector Co.
NEW - A history of The Wheeler Reflector Company and tips on how to tell if mirror has been replaced on a shade
Other Manufacturers

This section is a lot of incomplete work and will be updated shortly. For now it serves to give you some extended information on some companies, but will be a much better tool when it is complete
NEC
This section is everything you ever wanted to know about the National Electrical Code (NEC) but had no one to ask. Downloads of old NEC's, meetings and much extended information is provided.
GECO Sockets

More companies will be added to this list in the near future. We will also be adding a new list of post 1900 sockets and items.

Bergmann & Co.

Brush Electric Co.
Bryant Electric Co.
Crown Elect MFG Co.
EE&S
Holmes & Gale (HG)
Perkins
Thomson-Houston
Westinghouse
Tutorial And Early Lighting History


The Lighting Time Table

To read the entire tutorial, you can just click on the first link and then continue to the next section at the bottom of each page. Or, you can select links below of interest to you.

PRE 1900 SECTION

Overcoming Obstacles

About Early Electric Lighting, Generators, Arc Lamps, The First Edison Socket, Menlo Park, etc.
The First Fixtures
About The Start Of The First Incandescent Lighting Fixtures
Light Reflection
About Early Light Bulbs And Candle Power vs. WATTS
Edison-Bergmann
About Sigmund Bergmann And The Start Of Bergmann And Company Lighting Fixtures
Lighting Break Down
A Quick Break Down Of Different Lighting Time Periods
Styles 1881 to 1884
Bergmann Fixtures And Styles
Other Pre-1888 Styles
About Early Companies That Sold Lighting Systems And The Fixtures That They Sold With Their Lighting Systems
The U.S. Elect. Co.
The United States Electric Company History And Early Items
The Brush Elect. Co.
The Brush Electric Company History And Early Items
Thomson-Houston
The Thomson-Houston Electric Company History And Early Items
Westinghouse
About The Westinghouse Manufacturing Company History And Early Mergers
Mid 1880's Styles
About The Start Of Electrical Supply Houses and how new lighting styles came about
Pre 1900 Sockets
About Early Light Sockets And How To Tell The Difference
1887 New Items
1888 New Items
1890 New Items
1891 New Items
1892 New Items
1893 New Items
1894-1896 Items
1897 New Items
1898 New Items
1899 New Items
Above are catalog items sold in different years. There is no space to duplicate items, so only new and unique items from each year are shown. You would need to view the catalogs for yourself to be complete as I am only highlighting items. You can view catalogs here.

EXTRA INFO
Victor Shade Holder
About The Victor Shade Holder, Atwood And The Standard Holder

I.P. Frink 1899 Items
About Frink & Wheeler
New Wheeler Inverted
Three Links About Mirror Reflector Manufacturers And Their Items And History.
Wheeler Reflector Co.
NEW - A history of The Wheeler Reflector Company and tips on how to tell if mirror has been replaced on a shade

Early Desk Lamps

Some Help In Telling Them Apart

Vitrite And Luminoid

About The Vitrite Holders And Early Vitrite History

Brush-Swan Holder

About Brush-Swan Shade Holders

Cord Balls
My cord pendant adjuster project, as well as a good history about them.

POST 1900 SECTION

About 1900 Styles
This section covers a basic into into the 1900 section covering information about the 1899 transition, electrical code changes, lighting influence, sharing and licensing of patents and then into the new section of electrical specialty manufacturers,

Electrical Specialty Manufacturers
Harvey Hubbell
This section covers some early history periods of pre Hubbell-Grier, Hubbell-Grier, Harvey Hubbell, Hubbell Company. It also covers a number of items that helped change lighting styles,

Benjamin
This section covers some early history periods for the Benjamin Electric MFG. Co, as well as a small section on Dale and The Federal Electric Company

Dale
Federal Electric

This post 1900 section continues to be under current construction

Please Check Back.



Hubbell Sockets
Harvey Hubbell II, was the first to patent a pull chain style socket.

A drawing from the socket patent August 11th of 1896
patent number 565541 which is shown to your right with the old standard one piece shell. This socket came with an internal pulley switch operated by a silk tuna line pull cord that came with a ball at the end.

Some time after Jan 28th 1901 the Company was known as THE HUBBELL - GRIER ELECT. CO. Sockets made in 1901 were marked with this Company name.

The Hubbell-Grier Elect Company name was also used in the first product catalogue in 1901. As shown in the pictures below, sockets are called "H-G Pull Sockets".



It is unknown if Grier was a business partner in the early years, but by Sept 4th 1901 no more mention of Grier is made and sockets are simply marked "Harvey Hubbell". More about this topic...

Harvey Hubbell incorporated in the State of Connecticut in the year 1905 under the name "Harvey Hubbell INC.".

A full history of the Hubbell Company from 1888 to date can be seen on their web site at: http://www.hubbell.com/history.htm

In the same year, the Company registered a trademark. They selected the 'globe logo' that had been used by Harvey Hubbell on his business stationary as early as 1901. This trademark (a sphere with meridian lines and the name "HUBBELL" centered within) is frequently seen on sockets that came out after 1909 and are also the most common found today. The mark on these sockets is sometimes referred to as "the globe logo".

Harvey Hubbell always had new ideas and solutions to problems that existed with other manufacturer's designs. He was one to see an unnecessary problem with something and take it upon himself to design his own invention that fixed the problems.

Between 1896 and 1909 he was granted 45 patents on a wide variety of electrical products. We have archived over 100 Hubbell patents for you at this link.

Some possible known pull chain switch and shell configurations are shown below.
The research test bed of shells and switches has been selected from over one hundred different examples obtained from at least 80 different sources. The rarity is based on a scale of 1 to 10 (10 being the most rare)

PATENT DATE(S) Description of pull chain socket models and patent dates RARITY
First model with or without patent date on the shell.

This is the earliest and extremely rare Hubbell pull socket.
This model was patented August 11 1896 shown to your left.
It had a tuna line silk cord which was known for breakage.
This was replaced with a chain In 1900 with a new socket design that had a wider shell.
This new socket type was also insulated better internally, which allowed for the stronger brass pull chain.

If you have this model we would like to purchase it from you.
RARITY
10
Manufactured
Oct, 1899
To
June, 1905


The Shell Is
Marked With Two Patent Dates
Aug.11.96

May 8.00
Hubbell Thomson-Houston Style Socket
Patent Approved May 8th 1900

This model only has two patent dates on the shell. Aug.11.96 & May 8.00
It is assumed that the lid screw threads into the body of the shell by use of the threaded rivet hole as in the 1901 patent.

Note that there is a 1903 version of this shell and socket that is marked with all four patent dates. There is also a 1905 version in a new rivet cap shell with all patent dates marked Harvey Hubbell Inc. This shell must had been made and sold up until mid 1905 when it would have been replaced with the Insulating Screw Shell. The screw shell was made for for use with Thomson-Houston lamps. The June 1905 patent number was 817484.

E-Z IDENTIFICATION
  1. It will only have the two patent dates.
  2. The bell shaped guide is attached to the shell (not the switch inside)
  3. This version will have a heavy pull chain compared to newer sockets.
  4. It will have a flat square tip on the acorn (as shown on your right) instead of the distinct point that later models had.
  5. There is no embossed word HUBBELL under the chain guide as on common 1903 shells.
  6. It will have the older Thompson-Houston style socket


    The Thompson-Houston center is shown to your left.

    Dates 1900 - If it has two patent dates

    If you have this 1900 model (or one with less than 4 patent dates) we would like to purchase it from you.
The two sockets above used the older Thompson-Houston style sockets.

By the year 1900 the Edison screw type base owned over 60% of the market. It was for this reason that by the year 1900 almost all socket manufacturers chose to use the Edison screw base as their standard. Adapters were made for the Thompson-Houston style sockets so that they could easily adapt to the Edison style bulb.

1901 marks the year that Hubbell came out with a patent for their own Edison style socket shown below.

Edison Style Screw Base
Manufactured
Jan, 1901
To
July, 1901


The Shell Is Marked With Three Patent Dates

Aug.11.96

May 8.00
July 30.01
HUBBELL-GRIER - First Edison Style Socket
Patent Approved July 30.01

This model has three patent dates on the shell. Aug.11th 1896, May 8th 1900 and July 30th 1901.

It is marked "HUBBELL-GRIER ELECT. CO." above the patent dates as shown to your right.

The lid screw threads into the body of the shell by use of a threaded rivet hole as shown in the picture to your left.


E-Z IDENTIFICATION
  1. This shell has a threaded hole on the BODY and the CAP has a punched hole.
  2. It will have the three patent dates
  3. It is marked HUBBELL-GRIER ELECT CO.
  4. The bell shaped guide is attached to the shell (not the switch inside)
  5. It uses mica for socket switch insulation with a flat tip screw center.
  6. This version will have a heavy pull chain compared to newer sockets.
  7. It will have a flat square tip on the acorn (as shown on your right) instead of the distinct point that later models had.
  8. There is no embossed word HUBBELL under the guide as on common 1903 shells.


    The Mica center is shown to your left.

    Dates 1901 - The shell marks were not made after 1901

    If you have this model we would like to purchase it from you.
RARITY
9.0

RESEARCH

Shell Patent
for cap
attachment
No. 679316
July 30.01


Always Uses
Socket Switch
Square-A


Has
Cap Screw
Threads On
Shell Base


Uses
Pre-1904
Acorn


Uses
Raised Bead
For Filter

More about Grier
Manufactured
July, 1901
To
May, 1902


The Shell Is Marked With Four Patent Dates

Aug.11.96

May 8.00
July 30.01
Feby.18.02
HARVEY HUBBELL NO INC (Full Socket)
THE REAL 1902 PATENT
Patent Approved Feb 18 1902

This model has four patent dates on the shell. Aug.11th 1896, May 8th 1900, July 30th 1901 and
Feb.18th 1902.

It is marked "HARVEY HUBBELL" above the patent dates as shown to your right.

The 1902 patent was added for the entire socket. The 1901 patent was only used to show how the cap screw threaded into the base. This 1902 patent was the first patent to describe the switch. Other then this fact; The shell and switch are identical to the version above, with the exceptions of the "HUBBELL-GRIER ELECT CO." being replaced with "HARVEY HUBBELL" and the new patent date being added to the shell. Since the 1901 patent was so short lived, it may have had something to do with (or a convenient method of reason) in getting rid of the "GRIER" name.

E-Z IDENTIFICATION
  1. This shell has a threaded hole on the BODY and the CAP has a punched hole.
  2. It will have the four patent dates
  3. "HARVEY HUBBELL" above the patent dates
  4. The bell shaped guide is attached to the shell (not the switch inside)
  5. It uses mica for socket switch insulation with a flat tip screw center.
  6. This version will have a heavy pull chain compared to newer sockets.
  7. It will have a flat square tip on the acorn (as shown on your right) in place of the distinct point that later models had.
  8. There is no embossed word HUBBELL under the chain guide as on common 1903 shells.



    The Mica center is shown to your left.

    Dates 1902 - This socket shell was not made after 1902


Manufactured

May, 1902
To
1905



The Shell Is Marked With Four Patent Dates


Aug.11.96

May 8.00
July 30.01
Feby.18.02

Early Version
Shell Cap
Patent 720808


Early Version
No Rivets 1902
RARITY 8.0



HARVEY HUBBELL NO INC (1903 SOCKET SHELL)
1903 PATENT - MARKED 1902
Patent Approved Feb 17 1903

As above, this model also has four patent dates on the shell. Aug.11th 1896, May 8th 1900, July 30th 1901 and
Feb.18th 1902.

It is marked "HARVEY HUBBELL" above the patent dates as shown to your right. After incorporating in 1905 this mark was changed to "HARVEY HUBBELL INC."

Unlike the shell above, the lid screw threads into the shell cap by use of a hole strip which is riveted to the inside of the cap. This is shown in the picture to your left.

The 1901 patent date did not apply to this shell. There was a new patent in 1903 that shows this new method of attaching the shell cap (Feb 17th 1903 pat no. 720808) which was not stamped on this new shell style. In fact as of the 1902 patent Hubbell rarely updated patent dates on their shells, even though newer patents had come out. During patent research I have found only one case so far where a new patent date was used on a shell dated 1908 which had all of the patent dates but missing the "1901" date which was replaced with the new cap patent number. In later years, patent dates were done away with entirely and replaced with the Hubbell Trademark Logo.

E-Z IDENTIFICATION
  1. This shell has the threaded hole in the CAP and the BODY has the punched hole.
  2. It has four patent dates
  3. It is marked HARVEY HUBBELL (without the trailing "INC")
  4. The bell shaped guide is attached to the shell (not the switch inside)
  5. It uses mica for socket switch insulation with a flat tip screw center.
  6. Early examples of this shell version have the heavy pre-1904 acorn, while later examples will have a post 1904 chain finial.
  7. The embossed word HUBBELL is under the chain guide.



    The Mica center is shown to your left.
    Dates 1902 - 1905 and shell mark not made after 1905
    Note that this shell was sold out of overstock well after 1905 and is sometimes found with different switch types.



RESEARCH

Shell Patent
720808
Feb 17 1903

Commonly Use
Socket Switch
Square-A

&
Socket Switch
Circle-A


Has
Screw Threads
On The CAP


Uses
Pre-1904 Acorn
&
Post-1904 Acorn

Uses
Raised Bead
For Filter


Later Version
With Rivets Post 1903
RARITY 6.0



Manufactured
Between
1904
To
1909



The Shell Is Marked With Four Patent Dates

Aug.11.96

May 8.00
July 30.01
Feby.18.02

The shell above was
based on the patent shown below


New Chain Guide For Pull Sockets
RARITY 07

Patent # 817485
Applied For
07/14/1905

Approved On 04/10/1906

HARVEY HUBBELL NO INC - PROTOTYPE THREADED CHAIN GUIDE
(1903 SOCKET SHELL)
- Patent Approved Feb 17 1903

As above, this model also has four patent dates on the shell. Aug.11th 1896, May 8th 1900, July 30th 1901 and
Feb.18th 1902.

It is marked "HARVEY HUBBELL" above the patent dates as shown to your right. After incorporating in 1905 this mark was changed to "HARVEY HUBBELL INC."


This was a special offer of a factory installed patent 817485 extended guide. There was not a patent for this special modified shell version of the giude. This version worked by having a factory installed threaded hole on the shell that the guide screwed into. This version is shown in the Hubbell 1906 catalog. Early versions of this design (as shown to your left) have no threads on the guide itself. Versions from late 1905 started threading the end of the chain guide tube. This invention was replaced in 1909 with a new version that attached directly on the switch which came with much stronger connections.

This new beta guide would have allowed different lengths of guides for those using it on a fixture, but the longer it gets, the less stable it would become. The guide shown above in the beta version is thin brass that bends and deforms easily. When it is screwed in tight, it would not be a difficult task to break it off the threaded shell body making it unusable. This was the reason for adding the threads on the guide tube in the 1905 version as shown in the hubbell 1906 catalog picture to your right.

The invention shown on your left also had an added bonus of being able to attach over existing guides of other socket manufactures.


E-Z IDENTIFICATION
  1. This shell has the threaded hole in the CAP.
  2. It has four patent dates
  3. It is marked HARVEY HUBBELL (without the trailing "INC")
  4. The bell shaped guide is attached to the shell which is removable by unscrewing it from a threaded hole on the shell body.
  5. It uses mica switch insulation with a flat tip screw center.
  6. Early examples of this shell version have the heavy pre-1904 acorn, while later examples will have a post 1904 chain finial.
  7. The embossed word HUBBELL is under the chain guide.



    The Mica center is shown to your left.
    Dates 1902 - 1905 and shell mark not made after 1905
    Note that this shell was sold out of overstock well after 1905 and is sometimes found with different switch types.
1904 Prototype

No Patent

Beta 1904 Version
RARITY

8.0

1905 Version
RARITY
7.0


RESEARCH

Commonly Use
Socket Switch
1-2


Has
Screw Threads
On The CAP


Uses
Post-1904
Acorn


Uses
Raised Bead
For Filter
Manufactured
1905
To
1909


The Shell Is Marked With Four Patent Dates

Aug.11.96

May 8.00
July 30.01
Feby.18.02
HARVEY HUBBELL INC (1903 SOCKET SHELL)
Patent Approved Feb 17 1903

This model has four patent dates on the shell Aug.11th 1896, May 8th 1900, July 30th 1901 and
Feb.18th 1902.

It is marked "HARVEY HUBBELL INC" above the patent dates as shown to your right. After incorporating in 1905 this mark was added to the shell.

As in the example above,The 1901 patent does not apply to this shell.

The only difference between this and the example above, is the "INC" being added to the shell. Since this is a latter example of the socket, it is commonly found with Post-1904 acorn finials and later switches such as the 1-2 and A2 switch types.

E-Z IDENTIFICATION
  1. This shell has the threaded hole in the CAP and the BODY has the punched hole.
  2. It has four patent dates
  3. It is marked HARVEY HUBBELL INC
  4. The bell shaped guide is attached to the shell (not the switch inside)
  5. It uses mica for socket switch insulation with a flat tip screw center.
  6. Most all of these models will have a post 1904 chain finial.
  7. The embossed word HUBBELL is under the chain guide.




    The Mica center is shown to your left.

    Dates 1905 - 1909 and shell mark not made after 1909
RARITY
4.0


RESEARCH

Shell Patent
720808
Feb 17 1903

Commonly Use
Socket Switch
1-2

&
Socket Switch
A2


Has
Screw Threads
On The CAP


Uses
Post-1904
Acorn


Uses
Raised Bead
For Filter
Manufactured
March 1907
To
1917

The Shell Is Marked With FIVE Patent Dates

Aug.11.96

May 8. 00
Feb.18.02
Jan.14.08
Oct.13.08

Note that the patent date July 30.01 is not on this shell.
HARVEY HUBBELL INC - 1st Without Chain Guide Attached To Shell
(1907 SOCKET SHELL)
- Patent Approved Jan 14 1908

This is the first socket example without the chain guide being attached to the shell. This model was right before they stopped using patent dates on their shells. This socket shell screws together by means of a guide collar. It did not require any screws to attach the cap.

The cap and shell have different patents that were applied for the same day, though they were approved on different dates.

The new shell cap used two sets of threads in the cap wire hole with a screw connecting them. When the screw is tightened, the threads tighten down around the fixture's threads causing it to lock solid into the top of the shell cap.

For more information see the switch types section here

E-Z IDENTIFICATION
  1. The shell screws together.
  2. It has five patent dates
  3. It is marked HARVEY HUBBELL INC
  4. The bell shaped guide is NOT attached to the shell (it is on the switch)
  5. It uses mica to insulate the switch.
  6. It will use a post 1904 chain finial.




    The Mica center is shown to your left.


    Dates Post March 1907


RESEARCH

Shell Pictured
In Patent
876552

Shell Cap
Patent No.

900854

Uses
Socket Switch
Type 0


Also note that this shell has been found with many other switch types (and factory installed parts) dating into 1917

Uses
1904-1909
Acorn


Uses
Raised Bead
For Filter
Manufactured
July 1909
To
Early 1910

The Shell Is Marked With Four Patent Dates

Aug.11.96

May 8.00
July 30.01
Feby.18.02
HARVEY HUBBELL INC - No Chain Guide Attached To Shell
(1909 SOCKET SHELL)

This model was right before they stopped using patent dates on their shells and has all four patent dates on the shell. Aug.11th 1896, May 8th 1900, July 30th 1901 and Feb.18th 1902 and is marked Harvey Hubbell INC. As in the example above,The patent dates on the shell do not apply to this socket.

For more information on this mark see the switch types section here

E-Z IDENTIFICATION
  1. This shell has the threaded hole in the CAP and the BODY has the punched hole.
  2. It has four patent dates
  3. It is marked HARVEY HUBBELL INC
  4. The bell shaped guide is NOT attached to the shell (it is on the switch)
  5. It does not use mica to insulate the switch as the older switches did.
  6. It will use a post 1904 chain finial.



    There is now no Mica used as shown to your left. This switch uses the wide tongue.

    Dates Post July 1909
RARITY
7.0

RESEARCH

Shell Pictured
In Patent
943077

Shell Cap
Patent No.

720808

Uses
Socket Switch
Type 1


Uses
1904-1909
Acorn


Uses
Raised Bead
For Filter
Manufactured
July 1909
To
1912

The Shell Is Marked
With the Hubbell
Globe Design
HUBBELL LOGO - No Chain Guide Attached To Shell
(1909 SOCKET SHELL)


This is the first socket example where Hubbell stopped using patent dates marked on the shells. The switch used for this model was still a prototype using some of the same parts from the older switches.

For more information on this mark see the switch types section here
Marked 50 C.P. is to be dated pre 1910. If the shell is marked 250 W, it is a post 1910 version.

Another easy way to tell the difference between these early switches is to look under the tongue. If there is a large screw under a long WIDE tongue. (as shown below), it is an older 1909 prototype switch. If it uses a nut and not a screw, it is always a newer version dating post 07/21/1910 as in patent 994588. Or If the tongue is more narrow then shown below, it could also be a newer switch using a screw as in patent number 994518. Also, older prototype switches from 1909 are also always marked on the top inside of the ceramic switch with the number 100 as shown here.


E-Z IDENTIFICATION
  1. This shell has the threaded hole in the CAP and the BODY has the punched hole.
  2. It has NO patent dates.
  3. It is marked with the Hubbell Logo with 50 C.P. 250V
  4. The bell shaped guide is NOT attached to the shell (it is on the switch)
  5. It does not use mica to insulate the switch as the older switches did.
  6. It will use a post 1904 chain finial.



  7. There is now no Mica used as shown to your left. This switch uses the wide tongue.

    Dates Post July 1909
RARITY
6.0

RESEARCH

Shell Pictured
In Patent
943077

Shell Cap
Patent No.

720808

Uses
Socket Switch
Type 1


Uses
1904-1909
Acorn


Uses
Raised Bead
For Filter

SHELL TYPES - Hubbell Finding Their Standard

During this time in history, many different shell designs were tried and used. This was a great prototype era as Hubbell even reworked some shells from one design to another, while in some cases selling the re designed shells to the public. Hubbell finally decided on a standard which was one of Bryant's patents. For reasons unknown, he either traded or bought patent rights to Bryant's Wrinkle shell.

Shown below are just some of the shell examples that you might find right before the Wrinkle shell era started. Note that Hubbell also used at least one other third party patent before making the deal with Bryant. He used a Weber patent (Pat No. 916812 ) shown in a shell example below.

Through the years both Harvey Hubbell and Harvey Hubbell Jr. came out with other shell patents, BUT never stopped using Bryant's Wrinkle shell during all of those years. Harvey Hubbell was fully capable of coming up with his own inventions and shell cap designs. It could be that Hubbell had designed a similar patent for the Weber shell that was not approved, or for unknown reasons chose to make a deal to use the Weber design as he did with the Bryant patent later. In any case it is a mystery why he would be using other inventor's patents in the place of his own inventions. As you go through different patents during this era you will see many different louvered type shells being invented. In fact as shown to your left Hubbell even invented some louvered designs of his own, even though he never stopped using the Bryant louvered design. Some believe that there was a friendship that developed and a deal to swap or share patents. This is mainly because Bryant started using Hubbell's patent for his removable chain guide about the same time in history.
RARITY 6.0
Used By Hubbell

1909 - 1912


Prototype shell pictured in removable chain guide patent

RARITY 8.0

Used By Hubbell
1907 - 1908



Patent No. 878634

RARITY 6.0
Used By Hubbell

1909 - 1910




Patent No. 947547
RARITY 6.0
Used By Hubbell

1912



Patent No. 1107951

Used By Hubbell

1910 - 1912


1910 is marked 50 C.P. RARITY 6.5 If the shell is marked 250W, it is a post 1910 version RARITY 6.0

Patent No.
916812
Example of the Hubbell-Weber shell shown to your left.

This shell was also used for key switches with a spring slit under the key hole.
RARITY 8.0

Here is an example of a prototype shell that is now a 1909 screw cap with rivets on the cap. It has been re worked by having the old shell locking test methods smoothed down and then converted to a riveted screw cap shell.
Hubbell Chooses The Bryant Wrinkle Shell As Their Standard In 1913

Bryant offered the first Wrinkle shell July 20th 1907 (pat 872283) also (pat 879819). The shell was not well received because it left the rectangular slots on the cap exposed (as shown on your left), which for this era of lamp making did not present a clean styled appearance. On Oct 20th 1908 Bryant added a ring around the slots (pat 958625) which caused the socket to get more of a market share. On Oct 22 1909 (patent no 958626) loosely fit the slot device into the shell cap. It would not surprise me if it was Harvey Hubbell that personally gave Bryant the idea to use the modified shell stops and the new method of securing the rectangular slot device into the shell cap shown in patent no 1121348 dated Dec 12 1913. It was this patent that Hubbell started using and selected as their standard shown to your right and below.

It is this shell that is used (with only slight differences in the stops) for the following Hubbell pull chain era.

There were other shell designs (some shown below), but these new designs were not well received and production on them stopped after a few years. During this time Hubbell continued to sell the Wrinkle shell design. In fact, Harvey Hubbell Inc. continued using it well after Harvey Hubbell's death in 1927.

Normal dating methods can be used for the shell designs such as UNO threads and switch types.

Dates 1913 to 1914 (with bead) RARITY 2.0 Dates Late 1914 with UNO threads (as shown) RARITY 1.0



Bryant Wrinkle Shell
Patent No. 1121348
Other Shell And Switch Types



Pat No. 1053175
June 17 1911
RARITY 9.0
Pat No. 1053176
Oct 19 1911
RARITY 9.0
Pat No. 1053177
May 06 1912
RARITY 9.0
Pat No. 1053179
May 06 1912
RARITY 9.0

Pat No. 1645952
May 09 1923
RARITY 4.0
It took almost five years for this candle socket patent shown to your left and below to become approved. Because of this, you will find many of these pull sockets with either no patent date at all or simply a pat applied for mark on the bottom frame of the socket. The socket uses the acorn patent 1504761 with a smaller size chain and acorn finial. It is also marked with the Hubbell globe logo. The patent was applied for on May 9th 1923 and approved on Oct. 18th 1927.



If it has the Patent Applied For mark it should be dated between 1923 to 1927-RARITY 6.0

If there is no patent mark or only the globe logo it should be dated post 1927-RARITY 4.0


RARITY 7.0

Patent No. 1686813 This patent was applied for on 09-29-1923 and one of Hubbell's Wrinkle shell inventions. It can be identified easily because the Wrinkle does not go all the way around the shell. It stops by the chain where there are two stops.


Miniature 2"
Socket & Switch
Used For Candle Bases


Everything about this socket is the same as the patents for the Wrinkle shell and newer switches only in miniature size. This socket is only two inches high. It comes with a miniature removable chain guide, miniature chain and acorn finial as well as the standard Wrinkle shell cap in a tiny size.

The patent on the chain finial dates this item to post 1922

RARITY 6.0


Shown compared to the standard size wrinkle shell.

These Chandelier Switches
Stem from the 1901 shell Patent No. 679316
You will find these switches used in many different configurations. As far as I can tell, there is not a single patent to cover these other then the 1901 shell patent. The switch so far is also the same old ceramic found in each example right up to the newest shell examples.

1901 Designs - RARITY 9.0

Each switch is marked with 187 (with an anchor) on the left side and the number 186 on the right.

Depending on the switch model the mark can either be on the top round of the corner, or the center of the ceramic as shown below.


Shown above is the standard Wrinkle shell design which dates post 1913 RARITY 5.5


Shown above is the press and turn shell design which has two slits for extra spring.
Dates Pre 1913 RARITY 5.0

1935 to 1938
Harvey Hubbell Jr.
Patent No. 2116518
RARITY 5.0


Bakelite Version
Post 1938
RARITY 5.5


Brass Modified Version
With Locking Slots
1936 to Post 1938
RARITY 5.0

Stem from 1935 Harvey Hubbell Jr.
Patent No. 2116518
Though these may not be as old, they tend to be more rare because there were not as many of these made as the Wrinkle shells. Also the Bakelite version was more prone to breakage.


IMAGE
DATING HINTS - Finials
DATE

Hubbell used this finial on the first pull socket that used the tuna line silk cord .
Bryant also used the Hubbell design as shown on page 24 of the 1895 Bryant catalog.


Hubbell Catalog No. 25 (45 Year Anniversary Advertisement)

Bryant 1895 Catalog
1896
To
1899


RARITY
10
Hubbell used this ornate acorn on their 1900 patent socket design.
It is still found in a Western Electric catalog dated 1901 that offers a Hubbell socket pictured with this finial design.
Western Electric Catalog  
1899
To
1901


RARITY
9.5

Hubbell and some other sockets made before 1904 use these acorn finials.
It is easy to tell the difference between these and other acorns, because this acorn is heavy and solid while others are hollow and weigh almost nothing.

The tip at the bottom is round and does NOT come to a sharp point at the end. This rounded tip is flat at the bottom as if it was hammered and is almost always sharp to the touch around the edges. This tip sticks out almost 1/16th of an inch.

Note: There are some bad reproductions of this finial. Please see our pull chain section for some examples of these and how to tell the difference.

1901
To
1904


RARITY
7.0
These are hollow much lighter finials with a distinct point at the end. These do not have flat tips at the bottom like those before 1904 or the dented tip of those after 1909.

The point is sharp and distinct and normally sticks out almost 1/16th of an inch.

1904
TO
1909

RARITY
4.0
These finials are the most common seen today, coming from the more common Hubbell sockets without the chain guide attached to the shell..

The acorns are hollow just like those above, but without with a distinct point at the end. These finials have more of a dented or punched out tip.

The point is not sharp or distinct at all and normally sticks out just enough to give it the form and appearance of a tip.
AFTER
1909

RARITY
2.0

These acorns unscrew. Like many other examples of Hubbell's prototypes, the invention was not patented until the final product was decided on. In this case the removable acorns shown below in patent 1504761.


A special thanks goes to Don Shay from "Don's Lamps" who provided this example.
AFTER
1903
&
BEFORE
1910

RARITY
10




Though the patent for this finial was applied for in 1923, there are earlier examples of crimp on acorns predating 1909. However this example that uses the slide in clamp is most common and is is dated post 1922.

This type of finial was used for different reasons.
As a replacement: There was an ad put out by Hubbell that stated "Extra acorns can be furnished so that they may be fastened to chain by the use of ordinary wireman's pliers". This finial was also used for hard to get to areas such as a candle socket or cylinder lamp. Many of these hard to get into areas were only a few inches from the hole to the socket. However these became quite common and began to be used on newer sockets as a standard.

To see if you have the slide in clamp model, you can squeeze the clamp tight around the ball with your fingers. Now pull up softly. If it is the 1922 model it will slide upward as shown.

Tassels using this method started being offered late in 1923 though they became more common during the indicating pull socket era of 1926 to 1930. RARITY 2.0
Patent No.
1504761


AFTER
1922

RARITY
1.0



Indicating pulls started being used in 1926 and shown in the patent for the Indicating Pull Socket patent no. 1736285. The Indicating Pull Socket was one of Harvey Hubbell's last inventions. He died on December 17, 1927. This patent was approved Nov 19th 1929 after his death. His son Harvey Hubbell III, succeeded him as President of Harvey Hubbell, INC.

The i
ndicating pull worked by crimping a larger brass ball cover, over one of the pull chain balls close up to the switch. The switch was designed to hold back some of the chain in the "off" position and release it in the "on" position. Depending on how close that you put the ball to the switch, it could cause the ball to be appear hidden when the switch was off and visible when turned on.

Even though you may find these indicating chains on non-indicating sockets, the chain (if factory installed) dates your item to post 1926 which is when the pull was invented.
AFTER
1926

RARITY
1.0

DATING HINTS - Threaded Holes In Shell base

Note: This section ONLY applies to shells with the chain guide attached to the shell

CAP SCREW - THREADS ON SHELL -
May, 1902 & Earlier

Notice that the cap screw on this model threads into the shell base. The method of threading into the the shell base was updated in later years. This was mostly because the base was thin and could not support the screw with confidence. A new method of threading the shell cap was developed and shown in a 1903 patent. This method of attaching the shell cap was used on the patented 1901 examples and it was also likely to have been used on the older 1900 patent as well.

It was not changed until the new shell version came out in May of 1902 which was patent approved on Feb 17 1903.


Patent No. 679316
Approved
July 30th 1901

CAP SCREW - THREADS ON CAP - May, 1902 & After

Notice that the shell shown on your left does not have a threaded hole.

Also notice that the shell cap has the thread bars riveted to the cap in the picture shown to your right.

These rivets are easily noticed from looking at the outside of the shell cap. When you see that a socket has rivets on the socket cap above the screw, you know that the socket is to be dated early 1903 or later.



Stamped out shell cap hole
May 1902 and before


Early Version
No Rivets May 1902 to Early 1903



Early Version
Inside View

Rivets on the shell cap
1903 and After

Quick Tip: To find the older Hubbell sockets at a quick glance, FIRST look for the chain guide being attached to the shell: Now look for a cap with a screw in it that is missing the rivets. You can also look for the chain guide attached to the shell WITHOUT the word HUBBELL under the guide.

Patent No. 720808 Approved
Feb 17 1903




DATING HINTS - Handel Tag

Handel Sheet Brass Tag

Though the Handel lamp Company is known to have used some Bryant sockets, they almost exclusively used Hubbell on most of their lamps.

In some rare cases you can find Hubbell and Bryant sockets signed with a Handel tag. These tags are made from sheet brass and embossed from the rear. The Handel style of marking shown to your right is after 1910 using the two stars. If the mark does not have the stars, it would be a tag made before 1910.

Any lamps that you come across with sockets that have the Handel tag with the two stars is to be dated after 1910. The sockets sometimes can date earlier. We have come across a few 1904 sockets with these Handel tags (pictured on the right) which only means that Handel put some of these tags on older socket inventory.
Lamps tagged without the stars are to be dated before 1910


DATING HINTS - UNO Filter Threads

UNO FILTER THREADS - Post 1914


Pat No. 753077
All of the previous shell versions used a raised bead around the bottom of the shell like the one shown on your right. Either a shade or shade holder called a 'filter' was attached to the socket shell using either a threaded ring like the one shown to your left which was mounted over this bead. Or sometimes a screw clamp filter that was clamped on the tube of the socket shell.

1914 marks the year that sockets with the new UNO threads (shown below) started being put directly on the socket tubes in place of the bead.

There was a lot of old beaded shell stock, so these type shells would have still been used on items for several more years. However new designed shells of this era started using UNO threads.

Any sockets that you come across that have the UNO threads like those shown below, are to be dated after 1914.

 

Raised Bead
Most times 1914 and before


UNO Threads
Always Late 1914 and After
 

DATING HINTS - Hubbell Patents

HUBBELL PATENTS

In some cases patents can be a good tool for dating objects.

There are some things that you will need to watch for when using patents for dates, but for the most part when it comes to Hubbell you are safer using this section rather then going by only the dates found on items.

  • There are some cases where old or incorrect dates were used on shells:
    This could cause you to date the item incorrectly with the date on the item when it was in fact a much later patent.

  • Cases of 'patent applied for' taking up to three years to get approved:
    This could cause you to date the item three years newer, when in fact it was sold to the public three years earlier while in the patent applied for stage. Keep in mind in these cases, it can help date it older if the date is not on the item, but newer if it is.

  • Cases where parts or methods are being used already, but not actually described in an official patent until years later:
An example of this would be where a feature is displayed in a diagram drawn for one patent in 1906. It already may have been a common method used on this types of item, or something used on another item type already for years. Now lets say in 1910 the method or part is actually described in the writing of the patent. Because it is now being described it has now become part of the patent, which is far different from just being included in a previous drawing. It is sometimes helpful to analyze the patent drawings for what was common in the era or in the artists mind while drawing the pictures. Another part of research that we will be adding to this site at a later date will be scans of old paper. For example an ad placed in a newspaper on May 18th 1903 that shows a picture of an item can help us date it to that era.

For the current patent research click on the link below:

PATENT RESEARCH


DATING HINTS - CERAMIC SWITCH MARKINGS 1901 to 1909

This section covers older Hubbell switches that use the shell models shown to your left.

These are the older Hubbell models that had the chain guide attached to the shell.

There are two basic versions of this shell.

  • The one on the right is older and was made starting Jan 28th 1901 (could have been used sooner) Patent No. 679316.
    It was distributed as late as 1902


  • The one on the left was made starting May 26th 1902 Patent No. 720808 and distributed and as late as 1909.

For more information about the difference in these two shell models see the Threaded Holes Hint Section.

The switches covered in this section are found in socket shells with the markings that are shown below:


HUBBELL-GRIER ELECT CO

HARVEY HUBBELL : (no INC.on shell)

HARVEY HUBBELL INC.

Patent dates found on shells:

HUBBELL-GRIER ELECT CO.: Aug.11.96 & May 8.00 & July 30.01
HARVEY HUBBELL : (no INC.on shell) Aug.11.96 & May 8.00 & July 30.01 Feby.18.02
HARVEY HUBBELL INC. : Aug.11.96 & May 8.00 & July 30.01 Feby.18.02


Ceramic Switch Marks
There are many unanswered questions when it comes to dates.
We have done our best to be sincere and fit everything into the proper prospective. When it comes to the different switch types, it is easy enough to figure out the order of things. But, when it comes to actual dating there are just to many unanswered questions. For example: There are socket shells as well as patented Hubbell multi socket clusters, chandeliers and many other items that date from 1904 to 1905 that are proven to be all original. Many of these use the common A2 switch which was Hubbell's last switch type for these shell models. Knowing that we are complete on these switch types; And figuring in the time factors of the dates that these shells were sold to the public; As well as Hubbell's Incorporation date, we had expected the A2 switches to date much later. There is no other conclusion but to say that this switch type was completed and no longer needed improving by late 1904 to early 1905. These switches were then used in these shell types until Hubbell stopped selling them. There is just no other answer as to why we can find the completed A2 switch used in firmly dated items. While it is true that overstock of the shells and clusters was obviously a fact, there are just too many examples of the A2 switches found on pre 1905 items. As we search through patents everything will soon become more clear, and this page will be updated with any new findings.

Please keep in mind that there was old shell stock waiting for switches to be installed into them. For example, a "Hubbell Standard" four socket cluster with a 1902 patent date could have been sitting in a box waiting to be installed into a fixture for a few years and ends up with an A2 switch in it. Which is the entire point of this dating system. When you are dating your item you can't always go by patent dates to know when it may have been first sold to the public.
Source Picture Of Switch Mark #1 / Where Mark #2 / Where Est. Date
Hubbell Shell Pat. 1900
No Rivets On Screw Cap
Type (square a)
Thomson-Houston Style
/ Top Outside / Bottom Inside
Date
This switch was the first pull "chain" Hubbell socket. This switch was not an Edison style socket. It was used for Thomson-Houston light bulbs. This shell was used until the new insulating screw shell (pat 817484) came out in 1905 which worked with both Edison and T-H sockets.
1899
to
06/28/1905

More info about T-H style sockets

RARITY
9.0
Hubbell-Grier Pat. 1901
No Rivets On Screw Cap
Type (square a)
/ Top Outside / Bottom Inside
Date
This switch was the first prototype after 1900 and the first Edison style socket.
Some of these Hubbell Grier switches do not have the A mark. You need to pull back the chain to see the B mark on the bottom.
1901
to
Early
1903

RARITY
07
Hubbell NO INC
Rivets On Cap
Type (square a)
/ Top Outside / Bottom Inside
Date
This is the same as shown above but in a new shell with the riveted cap. This is where the 1903 ending date is derived from. This shell type is still using the old switch type A style markings. This shell example is late 1902 to early 1903.
Same as shown above
Same as shown above
Same as shown above
1901
to
Early
1903

RARITY
7.5
Hubbell NO INC
Type (circle a)
/ Top Outside / Bottom Inside
Date
Rivets On Cap
This is more then likely the completed type A version. The A mark is more pronounced and cleanly stamped in a deep circle in place of the shallow square.
Early
1903
to
Early
1904

RARITY
6.0
This socket switch also has a few new marks. There is a [square] indent next to the [B] on the bottom outside. Like the other examples you can see the B mark by pulling on the chain and looking under the switch. There is also a half moon with a circle next to it as shown in the picture to your right.
Hubbell NO INC
Type + Prototype
/TopOutside+proto blank /Bottom Inside+proto
Date
As shown above, Hubbell starts working through different switch variations of A (top) and B (bottom) now we see a beta transition where he starts numbering switches. 1 (top) and 2 (bottom). He started with a prototype in which the top was unmarked and the bottom was marked with a B that has a diamond around it. When the testing process is complete we have the 1 top and 2 bottom.
1904
to
1905


Prototype
RARITY
6.5

1.2 Switch
RARITY
5.0

Hand Written 1.2 Switch
RARITY
6.5


This new style switch was to open more room in the shell for the electrical wire. This was done by adding a dip into the top outside of the switch. You can also see in the picture below that more room was also added for the shell screw. The prototype shows a more rough notched out hole that gives a little more room then the previous A version. When this new switch was completed, we see the more pronounced factory finished shape. This 1-2 version is a rare switch that was likely only meant to produce the more common final product for this shell type, known as the A2 switch.

Close to the end of this 1-2 prototype or beta phase you can also find many of the prototypes marked 1 - 2 by hand on the top outside area. There is an example of this shown to your right.
Hubbell INC
Type (square A2)
/ TopOutside / Bottom Inside
Date
This was the final complete A2 switch which is basically the 1-2 switch shown above. Hubbell continued to use this switch in their remaining stock of these older model shells until they were phased out in 1909.
Late
1905
to
1909

RARITY
4.0
We believe that Hubbell spent their time after the completion of this switch, with their newer model shell and switch that is so common today. Hubbell knew that this socket model with the chain guide attached to the shell needed changing. After all, it was Harvey Hubbell that was always looking to make life easier for the everyday person by his inventions. He was always trying to better not only his own products, but others as well. We see a new prototype shell coming out shortly after 1905 shown in the next section.  

DATING HINTS - CERAMIC SWITCH MARKINGS 1909 to Post 1926
This section covers Hubbell switches that use these shells


These are the newer Hubbell models that had the chain guide attached to the SWITCH.

There are a few common shell versions.

  • The first was the prototype which used the older riveted shell cap. The switch was basically the old 1905-1909 switch with the chain attached to it using the new detachable chain guide patent 943077 dated 07/23/1909 which is pictured with this shell and switch. The next switch to come out (not found in any of our older shell examples) was applied for on 07/21/1910 Patent No. 994518 This helps us date the use of this shell version from 1909 until late 1910 though it could have been sold to the public as late as 1913 from old stock. If the shell is marked 250W, it is a post 1910 version.

  • The second example (left to right) was a Weber patent that was used from 1910 to 1912. You can read more about it here.

  • The next two shells were Bryant patents that Hubbell used that were commonly called the Wrinkle or louvered shell. You can read more about this shell design in this section.

While there were other shells used, these are the most common. The switches old to new (left to right) date from 1910 well into the 1930's. The last switch in line went through the most updates and revisions starting in 1926. The patent was applied for by Harvey Hubbell Sept. 1926 and was approved Nov 19th 1929 after his death.


MARKS FOUND ON SHELLS THAT USE THESE SWITCHES
HARVEY HUBBELL INC. 1909 to 1910
CURVED FONT - HUBBELL LOGO 50 C.P.
CURVED FONT - HUBBELL LOGO 250W.
HARVEY HUBBELL INC
Dates 1909 to 1910 - The shell has patent dates on the shell: Aug.11.96 & May 8.00 & July 30.01 Feby.18.02 : As of the 1902 patent Hubbell rarely updated patent dates on their shells, even though newer patents had come out. In later years, patent dates were done away with entirely and replaced with the Hubbell Trademark Logo.

CURVED FONT - HUBBELL LOGO 50 C.P. Dates 1910 and before
If the shell is marked 250W, it is a post 1910 version.

CURVED FONT - HUBBELL LOGO 250W. Dates 1910 to 1926
Note that this mark was also used on the Wrinkle shell starting in 1910
Also note that some time after Harvey Hubbell died and Harvey Hubbell Jr. took over that the curved font was used on some products up until 1938. An example is Pat No. 2116518 which was applied for 1935 and approved in 1938.


PLAIN FONT - HUBBELL LOGO 250W. Dates 1926 and after
Note above that this plain font may not have been long lasting.

PLAIN FONT - HUBBELL LOGO 250W.

Ceramic Switch Marks
There are many unanswered questions when it comes to dates.
We have done our best to be sincere and fit everything into the proper prospective. When it comes to the different switch types, it is easy enough to figure out the order of things. But, when it comes to actual dating there are just to many unanswered questions.

Please keep in mind that there was old shell stock waiting for switches to be installed into them. There is also the possibility of people repairing or upgrading switches. In cases like this, just finding the right fit for the first switch pulled out of a box could have been what was used. Then there is the dangerous person to watch out for. There was one contact that I had in the past that got old sockets in by the boxes. I was surprised to see that when he got in a load of these switches the procedure as he sat down to clean them. He would first take all of the sockets apart, throwing all of the switches into one box, caps in another and then start on the shells. When he was done with his cleaning, he would start putting together the puzzle taking no thought of what belonged where. As long as it fit together and looked right was all he cared about. Needless to say sockets from a contact like this can not be used for this type research. At the time of writing this I have used over one hundred different examples obtained from at least 80 different sources. As my research goes on I will keep this page updated with changes and additions.

SWITCH TYPES
TYPE #0 Comments
TYPE #0 Top View
TYPE #0 Front View
TYPE #0 Socket View
Est. Date
You will notice that this switch is the closest to the A2 (the last switch to be used in the older shells with the guide attached to the shell). This switch still uses mica in the socket, which is the only (pull switch) example found that still used mica in these newer shell types. The top of the switch does not have a place for the shell screw holes as it was used in a screw together shell patent no. 876552

Used from 1907 to 1909

Only used in
screw shells

RARITY
07

This switch has the mark 78 on the top outside and A on the bottom inside of the ceramic.
This switch also uses the first version of the removable chain guide patent no. 956354 applied for 05/17/1909 though it must had been used starting in March of 1907 seeing that there are no other patents of guides or switches that could have worked in shell patent 876552 which was applied for on this date.

This first RARE version of the guide was screwed directly into the ceramic as shown on your left.

The newer most common guide patent no.
943077 applied for 07/23/1909 is the one that is found on both Hubbell and Bryant switches today.

This newer guide snapped into a bracket which is screwed into the ceramic as shown on your right.

This type #0 switch was provided by Paul Crist the author of the book
Mosaic Shades II and owner of Paul Crist Studios.
You can also read his socket tutorial
here.
TYPE #1 Comments
TYPE #1 Top View
TYPE #1 Front View
TYPE #1 Socket View
Est. Date
You will notice that it has the same wire terminals as the older switch types. It also uses a large screw to hold the long wide tongue in the socket. All of the screws and terminals are brass. Notice the groves and holes on the sides which were there for the shell cap screws to fit into. This switch was only used in shells that had a cap that was held on with screws.

1909 to 1910

Only used in
shells with
caps that
had screws

RARITY
6.5

This switch always has the mark 100 on the top inside of the ceramic. Some switches will also be marked 101 on the bottom inside.
TYPE #2 Comments
TYPE #2 Top View
TYPE #2 Front View
TYPE #2 Socket View
Est. Date
Notice that the cap screw holes are gone. The terminals are now shorter with two wings. The top ceramic screws are now nickel (not brass). The tongue is now held in using a lug in the place of the old screw. The tongue is also now shorter and oval shaped. The ceramic has an oval shaped hole for the tongue to rest in.

1910 to 1915

Used only in
shells having
the raised
bead

RARITY
4.0

This switch always has the mark 111 on the top inside of the ceramic. It will most always also be marked 112 on the bottom inside.
TYPE #3 Comments
TYPE #3 Top View
TYPE #3 Front View
TYPE #3 Socket View
Est. Date
Notice that more space is given for the lamp wire to rest in above the terminals. Also, the terminals are now only held by one screw on the top inside of the ceramic. The tongue is now round and it sits in a rectangle hole where a lug is still holding it in place.
1916 to 1923

Only used in
shells having
UNO threads
RARITY
3.0
This switch always has the mark 317 on the top inside of the ceramic. It will sometimes be marked 112 on the bottom inside.
TYPE #4 Comments
TYPE #4 Top View
TYPE #4 Front View
TYPE #4 Socket View
Est. Date
Notice that even more space is now given for the lamp wire above the terminals. This makes the center stem noticeably more narrow. Only one of the terminal screws is now brass, the other is nickel. The lug that was holding the tongue has now been replaced with a rivet.

1923 to 1926
Still uses lug
RARITY
2.0

Post 1926
uses rivet for
the tongue
RARITY
1.0

This switch always has the mark 317 on the top inside of the ceramic. It will sometimes be marked 112 on the bottom inside. It can have numerous different marks such as boat anchors or stars.
Depending on the revision, it will be marked on the top tip above the wire terminals. Another mark is always on the lower side directly under that mark on the opposite side of the switch. Listed in order from oldest to newer the marks will be in combinations of W-A, W-B, W-1, W-2, W-3, W-4, 1-*, 2-*, 3-*, 4-* An example of what the marks look like are shown to your right.

This switch will also sometimes have numbers on the bottom outside under the socket threads.


Example Marked
W-3
RARITY
1.0
Please take note that there are earlier versions of this model switch that still use a lug to secure the tongue, the rivet was added in a later revision. Another change to this switch was the logo being stamped on the tongue which was done about the same time as adding the rivet. This switch unlike the others above, had more changes made to it then any other switch. This is also the last switch type that Harvey Hubbell designed before he died. Harvey Hubbell Jr. took over after his father's death. This switch stems to a patent that was applied for 09/21/1926 and approved on 11/19/1929. Harvey Hubbell passed on December 17, 1927 and Harvey Hubbell Jr. was 26 years old when taking over. This switch continued to be the the standard until the mid to late 1930's when Bakelite started to be used and pull chains were on their way out.

RESEARCH - More About The Hubbell-Grier Company Name

When searching through Hubbell's patents, we notice that in the early years Hubbell did not assign his patents to a Company, though this would be a common procedure once a Company is formed. This way the Company has total control of the patent which also includes the responsibility of protecting it. (Note that Harvey Hubbell officially incorporated in the State of Connecticut in the year 1905 under the name "Harvey Hubbell INC.")

Only at one point in time did Harvey Hubbell ever assign one of his patents to a Company name. As shown below in a patent applied for on July 24th 1901 the patent no. 693799 was assigned to the THE HUBBELL - GRIER ELECT. CO. This must have been a short lived partnership seeing that it only lasted for about eight months. This is seen by patent no. 679316 applied for on Jan 28th 1901 being assigned to Harvey Hubbell, patent no. 693799 applied for on July 24th 1901 assigned to Hubbell-Grier and patent no. 701269 applied for on Sept. 4th 1901 going back to the sole "Harvey Hubbell" with no assignor.


Not only did the patent reflect this new Company name, but the sockets during this time was also marked THE HUBBELL - GRIER ELECT. CO.. Advertising also reflected this in that the "The Hubbell-Grier Elect Company" name was also used in the first product catalogue in 1901. As shown in the catalogue pictures below, sockets are called "H-G Pull Sockets".

HUBBELL-GRIER Socket shell
Patent Approved July 30.01
The First Product Catalogue Dated 1901

The presence of this new catalogue at this date and time, leads me to believe that Grier may had offered his part in this partnership as a sort of marketing manager with promises of boosting sales. It could also be that Hubbell had a bad experience with this partnership which may have acted as a life lesson to him in these early years, to never assign his inventions to a Company again. It is also possible that there was a personal dispute along with threats to take control the Company or products.

I do not know why, or what problems Harvey Hubbell could have experienced, but one thing for sure is that during his life he NEVER assigned another invention to ANY Company name. EVERY other patent is solely assigned to the PERSON "HARVEY HUBBELL".

This was also carried down to his son who took the Company over after his death on December 17, 1927.
Harvey Hubbell Jr. was 26 years old at this time and had already spent years working in the Company and being taught by his father.
It took many years for Harvey Hubbell Jr. to finally start assigning his patents to the Company. All of his patents are solely owned by the PERSON "Harvey Hubbell Jr." until 1938 (in a patent approved on 05/10/1938) at which time he for unknown reasons started assigning his patents to "Harvey Hubbell, Incorporated".

Note: I have found MUCH more information on the topic of Hubbell-Grier and will be adding it with a future revision to this page.



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