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Post pictures of your items and ask questions or just learn from reading the posts from others

Ad Database
View or upload ads from antique magazines
Bulb & Socket Bases
View images of the most well known bulb and socket bases

Patent Utilities
Patent Linker
Lets You Pull Up Any Patent PDF File Or Link One Directly To Your Web Page
Group Patent Dbase
Lets You Download The First Page Patent Picture Of Every Patent On A Single Day To View On Quickly Your Local Computer
MultiView Search
Lets You Search For Patents Using Advanced Methods And Provides Hyper Links To The Patent Office And Google Patents

I have not had much time to get many items in the forsale area below. Please keep checking back as I will start adding more items soon.

Items For Sale

Cord Balls & Adjusters
NEW - My cord pendant adjuster project, as well as a good history about them.


Switch Material

Electrical Code
Mica Insulation
CP or WATTS Marks
Socket Bead/Rib/UNO
Catalogs & Ads
Patents
Pull Chains / Finials
Socket & Electrical Manufacturer's Items And Their History
GECO Sockets
NEW - This section will allow you to date and learn how to tell one GECO socket from the other.
Hubbell

This is where this site started from. Since this page was done, there has been much more Hubbell history and information found which will make for a complete redesign of this page and section in the soon future.
Hubbell Patents
This section has some early patent research on Hubbell. It is mostly complete with only a few missing patents which will be added in when this section is re done into the new format
Wheeler Reflector Co.
NEW - A history of The Wheeler Reflector Company and tips on how to tell if mirror has been replaced on a shade
Other Manufacturers

This section is a lot of incomplete work and will be updated shortly. For now it serves to give you some extended information on some companies, but will be a much better tool when it is complete
NEC
This section is everything you ever wanted to know about the National Electrical Code (NEC) but had no one to ask. Downloads of old NEC's, meetings and much extended information is provided.
GECO Sockets

More companies will be added to this list in the near future. We will also be adding a new list of post 1900 sockets and items.

Bergmann & Co.

Brush Electric Co.
Bryant Electric Co.
Crown Elect MFG Co.
EE&S
Holmes & Gale (HG)
Perkins
Thomson-Houston
Westinghouse
Tutorial And Early Lighting History


The Lighting Time Table

To read the entire tutorial, you can just click on the first link and then continue to the next section at the bottom of each page. Or, you can select links below of interest to you.

PRE 1900 SECTION

Overcoming Obstacles

About Early Electric Lighting, Generators, Arc Lamps, The First Edison Socket, Menlo Park, etc.
The First Fixtures
About The Start Of The First Incandescent Lighting Fixtures
Light Reflection
About Early Light Bulbs And Candle Power vs. WATTS
Edison-Bergmann
About Sigmund Bergmann And The Start Of Bergmann And Company Lighting Fixtures
Lighting Break Down
A Quick Break Down Of Different Lighting Time Periods
Styles 1881 to 1884
Bergmann Fixtures And Styles
Other Pre-1888 Styles
About Early Companies That Sold Lighting Systems And The Fixtures That They Sold With Their Lighting Systems
The U.S. Elect. Co.
The United States Electric Company History And Early Items
The Brush Elect. Co.
The Brush Electric Company History And Early Items
Thomson-Houston
The Thomson-Houston Electric Company History And Early Items
Westinghouse
About The Westinghouse Manufacturing Company History And Early Mergers
Mid 1880's Styles
About The Start Of Electrical Supply Houses and how new lighting styles came about
Pre 1900 Sockets
About Early Light Sockets And How To Tell The Difference
1887 New Items
1888 New Items
1890 New Items
1891 New Items
1892 New Items
1893 New Items
1894-1896 Items
1897 New Items
1898 New Items
1899 New Items
Above are catalog items sold in different years. There is no space to duplicate items, so only new and unique items from each year are shown. You would need to view the catalogs for yourself to be complete as I am only highlighting items. You can view catalogs here.

EXTRA INFO
Victor Shade Holder
About The Victor Shade Holder, Atwood And The Standard Holder

I.P. Frink 1899 Items
About Frink & Wheeler
New Wheeler Inverted
Three Links About Mirror Reflector Manufacturers And Their Items And History.
Wheeler Reflector Co.
NEW - A history of The Wheeler Reflector Company and tips on how to tell if mirror has been replaced on a shade

Early Desk Lamps

Some Help In Telling Them Apart

Vitrite And Luminoid

About The Vitrite Holders And Early Vitrite History

Brush-Swan Holder

About Brush-Swan Shade Holders

Cord Balls
My cord pendant adjuster project, as well as a good history about them.

POST 1900 SECTION

About 1900 Styles
This section covers a basic into into the 1900 section covering information about the 1899 transition, electrical code changes, lighting influence, sharing and licensing of patents and then into the new section of electrical specialty manufacturers,

Electrical Specialty Manufacturers
Harvey Hubbell
This section covers some early history periods of pre Hubbell-Grier, Hubbell-Grier, Harvey Hubbell, Hubbell Company. It also covers a number of items that helped change lighting styles,

Benjamin
This section covers some early history periods for the Benjamin Electric MFG. Co, as well as a small section on Dale and The Federal Electric Company

Dale
Federal Electric

This post 1900 section continues to be under current construction

Please Check Back.



About The National Electrical Code (NEC)




What Is The National Electrical Code (NEC)?
Where Did It Come From?
How Long Has It Existed?

These can be some confusing questions, even for those that are well versed in Electrical History.

Since the start of electrical history, Insurance Companies recognized the danger of electrical related fires and began to write electrical rules to be followed. The first documented case of a code as a 'requirement' of rules was first adopted on October 19th 1881, then published
November 16th 1881 entitled "The Dangers of Electric Lighting" put out by the New York Board of Fire Underwriters. These rules were released in Pamphlet form in November at their November 16th meeting. The code started with five rules and grew from there as time progressed.

As the idea of electrical codes and rules caught on, Cities, Insurance Companies, and other authorities also published their own codes.


Fire Damage Records In Dollars From 1884 To 1896.


THE FIRST ELECTRICAL CODES


One of the largest problems with early Electrical Code was that there were too many different codes written by different sources.

Also, these codes quickly became out dated, as new types of electrical products came out.
Keeping up with codes became even increasingly harder, as we began to progress and move closer to the 20th Century. The mass increase of books and electrical trade schools, brought more people into the electrical profession. Large companies started to flourish and new electrical inventions flooded the U.S. Patent Office.

If you were to search, you would find many different electrical codes prior to the National Electrical Code (NEC) which started being used as our standard in 1897.

Only some of the companies that published electrical codes are listed below to give you the basic idea:

The National Board of Fire Underwriters; American Institute of Mining Engineers; Underwriters’ National Electric Association; American Institute of Architects; American Society of Mechanical Engineers; American Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers; Western Union Telegraph Company; American Bell Telephone Company; American Street Railway Association; American Institute of Electrical Engineers; Bureau of Electricity, Pittsburgh; Factory Mutual Fire Insurance Companies; American Society of Civil Engineers; National Master Builders Association; National Association Fire Engineers; Postal Telegraph Company; New England Insurance Exchange; National Electric Light Association; etc.

You can now imagine the confusion that was taking place with so many different codes to choose from.
Not only did many of the codes differ one from another, but the quality of these codes differed too.
There was not enough qualified experience by those that wrote most codes in all of the different electrical products and professions, which was also endlessly increasing. This lack of knowledge and experience caused lines and even entire sections of one issued code, to be copied or adopted into other codes. Many city codes were simply mix mashes of several codes put together.

Another problem that existed was that insurance companies all adopted their own codes. Most of these were all mix mashes as well. In New York City alone (in 1895) there were over 50 different insurance companies out of which only about half of them had formed an insurance inspection association of their own. With so many different differing codes, electrical and mechanical engineers found it hard because one inspector would allow a job to be done one way, while another would not. Many times work needed to be redone (costing multiple thousands) over minor points that were of no real concern. It was simply that one inspector would allow it and another would not. In some cases it even came down to how the code was interpreted by one group of inspectors as opposed to another group.

If we were going to be safely carried into the next century, everyone needed to organize and group together.

One code for everyone, developed by a group well experienced in all of the aspects that needed to be taken into consideration.

These to name a few: Fire prevention, manufacturing, inventors, architects, electrical and mechanical engineers, street and railway, electrical lighting associations as well as underwriters and others that would benefit from a national code.


THE NATIONAL ELECTRIC CODE - ( NEC )


There was a first attempt to create a National Electrical Code that was released in 1892.
Along with revisions, the words "Rules & Requirements for the Installation of Electric Light & Power" were added in 1893. This work was by the Underwriters International Electric Association (the name changed shortly after to the Underwriters National Electric Association). Their rules were mostly taken from the rules of the National Electric Light Association. The National Electric Light Association rules were the first adopted rules by the Western Union Fire Underwriters' Association. It was the The National Electric Light Association's rules (starting with this edition) that was taken and modified by different boards of underwriters throughout the United States. In a meeting (linked below) William J. Hammer also made comments that even though their rules had been used, that no credit was ever given to the The National Electric Light Association by those that used them.

This early attempt (by the Underwriters National Electric Association) to make a National Electrical Code failed in late 1894. This was mostly because they did not have the support that would have been needed from the larger associations printing electrical codes.

In the beginning a large portion opposed its aims and purposes.
Their fear was that the fire underwriters of the country would be more powerful then the municipal, state, or even the United States, governments; that any law, edict or rule issued by them, whether right or wrong, could be enforced and must be obeyed. Still others (in these early days) simply had a prejudice against electricity. (natural gas was still being used for most lighting - even into the early 1900's)

Also, the common practice around this time was for fire underwriters to not receive any suggestions from the electric companies. They made their own rules, and they were like the laws of the Medes and Persians, unalterable.


When this National Code attempt did not come to a close, a new committee was formed (in 1894) by the National Electric Light Association. This committee began to plan what would be needed to bring a National Code to pass.

The Chairman of this committee was William J. Hammer and the committee first named "Standard Rules for Electrical Construction and Operation".

In April 1895 Hammer announced that (at the American Institute Of Electrical Engineers meeting April 17th 1895) that their committee (from the National Electric Light Association) will soon extend them an invitation.
(more on this history see these pages only pages 181 to 226 or see the entire conference)



THE CONFERENCE


In order to pull off a "National Electrical Code", they knew that support and adoption would need to come from most all of the largest groups that were publishing electrical codes.

These were:
American Institute of Architects
American Institute of Electrical Engineers
American Society of Mechanical Engineers
American Street Railway Association
Factory Mutual Fire Insurance Companies
National Association Fire Engineers
National Board of Fire Underwriters
National Electric Light Association
Underwriters’ National Electric Association



On March 18th and 19th of 1896 a joint conference was held.

This was called the National Conference on Standard Electrical Rules.

J O I N T C O N F E R E N C E

Of Electrical, Insurance and Allied Interests, looking toward the Adoption,

Promulgation and Enforcement of a National Code of Rules for Electrical

Construction and Operation,

Held at the Headquarters of the
American Society of Mechanical Engineers,
12 West 31st Street, New York City,
March 18 – 19, 1896.




At this meeting a committee of five members were appointed which was called the "Committee on Standard Electrical Rules".

Attendants:
Francis B. Crocker, American Society of Electrical Engineers;
Frank R. Ford, American Street Railway Association;
William H. Merrill, National Board of Fire Underwriters;
Francis W. Jones, Postal Telegraph Company;
A. S. Brown, Western Union Telegraph Company;
Alfred Stone, American Institute of Architects;
William Brophy, International Association Fire Engineers;
C. J. H. Woodbury, American Bell Telephone Company;
S. D. Greene and H. C. Wirt, General Electric Company;
Charles F. Scott, Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company;
E. A. Fitzgerald, Underwriters’ National Electric Association;
William J. Hammer, National Electric Light Association;
William Brophy, National Electric Light Association;
Harrison J. Smith, National Electric Light Association;
James I. Ayer, National Electric Light Association;
C. H. Wilmerding, National Electric Light Association;
William McDevitt, Board of Fire Underwriters, Philadelphia;
Morris W. Mead, Bureau of Electricity, Pittsburgh;
E. V. French, Factory Mutual Insurance Company, Boston;
A. E. Kennelly; W. J. Jenks; E. H. Johnson.

Minutes of the First Meeting of the National Conference On Standard Electrical Rules March 18, 19, 1896 Entire Meeting

 

AFTER THE FIRST CONFERENCE

The first to adopt the National Electrical Code was The National Electric Light Association.

The National Electric Light Association was first organized in 1885 with the help of Franklin S. Terry who was the founder and owner of the Sunbeam Incandescent Lamp Company (later named a vice president of General Electric)
For more on Terry see http://antiquesockets.com/c.html#Cutler

You can read the entire minutes of the meeting for the
National Electric Light Association HERE (see page 98 for the report on electrical rules) or only the NEC part of the report HERE.

American Institute of Electrical Engineers was organized in 1884 and incorporated in 1896.
 
Note Worthy Presidents Were:
Dr. Norvin Green 1884-1886,
Franklyn Pope 1886-1887
Edward Weston 1888-1889
Prof. Elihu Thomson 1889-1890
Alex. Grahm Bell 1891-1892
Dr. Edwin J. Houston 1893-1895
Dr. Francis B. Crocker 1897-1898

The current president Dr. Francis B. Crocker (shown to your right)
You can read the entire minutes of the all meetings for the American Institute of Electrical Engineers HERE (see the links below Adoption, Entire meeting on code and The code for only the small sections alone dealing only with the nec sections of the meeting).

For more then a year the Committee on Standard Electrical Rules worked and revised the code until it was mostly acceptable to those concerned. The final "Tentative" draft of the National Electrical Code was complete and voted on in their December 1896 meeting.

The National Electric Light Association was the first to officially endorse the 1897 National Electrical Code, approved unanimously in their second session of their meeting in Niagara Falls, N.Y. on June, 8th, 9th and 10th, 1897. Shortly after, three other organizations (Factory Mutual Fire Insurance Companies, National Board of Fire Underwriters and Underwriters’ National Electric Association) also voted in and unanimously adopted the 1897 National Electrical Code.

In September a letter was sent by William J. Hammer (of the National Electric Light Association) to the remaining associations to find out what action if any their associations had taken and how soon they proposed to take action, in order that he might bring it up at the September 15th 1897 meeting of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers.

Results of the letter:
The National Association of Fire Engineers had already unanimously adopted the 1897 code. The American Institute of Architects assured their approval at their next meeting. The American Street Railway Association also gave their assurance that they would adopt the code at their meeting in October. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers also responded that there is no question that they will approve and adopt the 1897 National Electrical Code (This was later approved at their November 30th - December 3rd 1897 meeting).

On hearing this and after some voiced concerns, the American Institute of Electrical Engineers became the sixth of the larger groups to unanimously adopt the 1897 NEC at their meeting September 15th 1897.
Adoption page 546 Entire meeting on code pages 513-546 The code pages 489-511


SUPPLEMENT CODES


It was stated in the minutes that there would be no changes in the 1897 NEC as presented for at least two years. This would give them time to perfect the code among themselves and get all of their disagreements settled.
It was stated that they all knew that the code was not perfect as presented, but it gave a good starting ground to build upon and bring a final end to the confusion in the electrical industry.

I will be working on a dating section soon that will compare important changes in code through history to the NEC, and then the NEC through the years. This will be good for dating items. Just like we know from the Edition of 1899 Supplement that manufacturers were now (starting in 1899) required to put ratings and markings on sockets, we can say that sockets with no marks are likely pre-1900. In the same way, if you were a collector of motors you can see by comparing fire underwriters codes from 18??-1895 that the addition was made in the 1897 National Electric Code on the topic of motors, machines, dynamo engines, etc., that they "must each be provided with a name plate, giving the makers name, the capacity in volts and amperes...". This helps collectors of these items to date them. It does not mean that early models did not have plates, but if there was no plate or it did not contain the correct info, it can at least give you a starting place to start researching.


The first revision to the National Electrical Code was in 1899 and called the "Edition of 1899" "SUPPLEMENT"

About the same time, a new committee was also formed called the "Committee on Standardization".
This new committee was to work towards the standardization of electrical manufacturing. The first step taken on standardization was on January 26th 1898 and was for the standardization of generators, motors and transformers which you can read about in the institute transactions Vol. XV, pages 3-32. Their first report was printed on June 26th 1899. (Institute transactions Vol. XVI pages 255-268). The committee held monthly meetings and carried on extensive correspondence with manufacturers, consulting and operating engineers as well as other interested parties. As changes and developments increased in the electrical industry, the original code needed to be updated and revised. Like the National Electrical Code, the Standardization Rules also continued to be revised.

New revised Standardization Rules were issued as shown below:

June 20th 1902 (transactions Vol. XIX pages 1075-1092)
June 21st 1907 (annual convention June 24-27 1907)
June 27th 1911 (annual convention June 27 1911)

During the next two years (1911-1913) the Standards Committee took on several changes and enlarged adding members (creating several subcommittees) and took on a radical revision to the rules.
This was completed on July 10th 1914 but not to go into force until it had an editorial revision.
This code went into force on July 1st 1915 and was the completion of the radical changes.

July 1st 1915 (June 30th 1915 meeting)
June 28th 1916 A number of changes deletions and additions were made (May 15-16 meeting)

At this point I will stop with the history and close with the point that it was the National Electrical Code - Rules & Requirements, as well as these great men in history that has helped to bring us into the electrical world that we now live in.


ELECTRICAL RESEARCH MATERIAL

If you have any copies of NEC's, (pdf, jpeg, tif, gif, original) books or other items that can be added to this page, please contact me. I am always looking for something that I do not already have. I will gladly add it to the site and give you recognition for it. My personal research only covers pre-1920, but if you have other codes I would be happy to add them to this page if you supply them.

NEC's & Electrical Codes - Confirmed Sightings Of: - Please help add to this resource

1881
New York Board Fire Underwriters - Oct. 19th, 1881
The New York Board of Fire Underwriters, at a meeting held this day, adopted the
following standard for Electric Light Wires, Lamps, etc., subject to future additions.
1881
New York Board Fire Underwriters - Oct. 19th, 1881
As Published In An 1882 Publication
1882
New York Board Fire Underwriters - Jan. 12th, 1882
The New York Board of Fire Underwriters, at a meeting held this day, adopted the
following standard for Electric Light Wires, Lamps, etc., in lieu of former standard.
1882
Standard Requirements of the New York Board of Fire Underwriters
Adopted January 12, 1882
Endorsed by the National Board of Fire Underwriters May 25, 1882
1882
Standard Requirements of the New York Board of Fire Underwriters
Adopted January 12, 1882
Endorsed by the National Board of Fire Underwriters May 25, 1882
This Copy Includes Copies of "Survey And Report" to be completed by Inspectors
1889
Rules And Regulations Of The New England Insurance Exchange
AND Boston Fire Underwriters Union for Electric Lighting

Adopted April 15th 1889 and Superseding all Previous Rules
Download / View
(3.1 MB)
Uploaded 01-29-08
1889
New York Board of Fire Underwriters
Adopted February 27th, 1889
Amended Standard for Electric Equipments
Download / View
(1.8 MB)
Uploaded 01-29-08
1890
Rules Of The National Board Of Fire Underwriters
Adopted by the New York Board of Fire Underwriters January 15,1890
Adopted for Promulgation to Members June 8th, 1890
Download / View
(15.7 MB)
1890
Rules And Requirements Of The New England Insurance Exchange
For Electric Lighting.
Adopted September 27, 1890 and Superseding all Previous Rules
Download / View
(25.9 MB)
1892
Rules Of The National Electric Light Association
Adopted at Montreal, Sept. 10, 1891 - AMENDED at Buffalo, Feb. 23, 1892
Download / View
(23.8 MB)
1894
Rules And Requirements of the National & New York Board of Fire Underwriters
For the Installation of Electric Light and Power
As Recommended By The Underwriters International Electric Association
January, 1894
Download / View
(17.5 MB)
1895
Rules And Requirements Of The National Board Of Fire Underwriters
For the Installation of Wiring and Apparatus for Electric Light and Power
As Recommended by the Underwriters National Electric Association
Edition Of Jan. 1,1895
Download / View
(46.7 MB)
1896
Rules And Requirements Of The National Board of Fire Underwriters
For The Installation of Wiring and Apparatus for Electric Light, Heat and Power
As Recommended by the Underwriters National Electric Association
Edition of January 1, 1896
Download / View
(28.8 MB)
1897
Underwriters’ National Electric Association
Rules And Requirements Of The
Underwriters Association
Adopted August 31, 1897
(thanks goes to Ken DePue for this download)
Download / View
(17.5 MB)
Newly Added
Uploaded 06-15-08
1899
National Electrical Code
Edition of 1899.- SUPPLEMENT
As Recommended by the Underwriters National Electric Association
1899
National Electrical Code
Edition of 1899

7th Edition, 2,500, April, 1899
(thanks goes to the allerhand collection for this download)
Download / View
(12.1 MB)
Uploaded 01-23-08
1901
National Electrical Code
Edition Of 1901
Rules and Requirements of the National Board of Fire Underwriters
For the Installation of Wiring and Apparatus for Electric Light, Heat, and Power
As Recommended by the Underwriters National Association.
Download / View
(48.5 MB)
1904
National Electrical Code
1904 NINTH EDITION
July, 1904 9th Edition, 6000
(thanks goes to the allerhand collection for this download)
Download / View
(50.9 MB)
Uploaded 01-23-08
1907
National Electrical Code
1907 No. 2 10TH EDITION
WITH 1909 SUPPLE
MENT

No. 2 10th Edition, 10,000-1907
(thanks goes to the allerhand collection for this download)
Download / View
(62.1 MB)
Uploaded 01-23-08
1909
National Electrical Code
1909 SUPPLEMENT ONLY
(thanks goes toBryan Holland for this download)
Download / View
(6.5 MB)
Uploaded 03-07-08
1909
National Electrical Code
Edition Of 1909
"National Electrical Code"
Installation Rules (except marine work)
(thanks goes toBryan Holland for this download)
Download / View
(7.6 MB)
Uploaded 02-07-08
1911
National Electrical Code
Edition Of 1911
WITH 1913 SUPPLEMENT
"National Electrical Code"
Installation Rules No. 2 11th Edition, 10,000-1911
(thanks goes to the allerhand collection for this download)
Download / View
(72.6 MB)
Uploaded 03-07-08
1913
National Electrical Code
1913 SUPPLEMENT ONLY
(thanks goes to the allerhand collection for this download)
Download / View
(8.7 MB)
Uploaded 03-07-08
1915
National Electrical Code
Edition Of 1915
"National Electrical Code"
Installation Rules No. 2 12th Edition, 8,500-1916
(thanks goes to the allerhand collection for this download)
Download / View
(71.2 MB)
Uploaded 03-07-08
1918
National Electrical Code
Edition Of 1918
Class "C" - Inside Work (Including all Work for Light, Power and Heat,
Protected by Service Cut-out and Switch, For Signaling Systems see Class E.)


Please contact me if you can help fill in ANY of the NEC codes above.

Any editions that are different or missing from above.

We are looking for those that can provide scans of entire missing editions.


NEC Related Books
- Please help add to this resource

1882
Incandescent Electric Lights - Edison Lamps At The Paris Exhibition
AKA: Incandescent Electric Lamps At The International Exhibition of Electricity
By Compte TH. DU Moncel - 1882
New York Board Fire Underwriters - Oct. 19th, 1881 Code on page 71
1882
Van Nostrand's Engineering Magazine
Volume XXVI - January - June - 1882 Whole No. 157 Volume 26. No. 1.
New York Board Fire Underwriters - Oct. 19th, 1881 Code on page 157
Download / View
(51.3 MB)
1882
Underwriters' Standard Requirements - Underwriters Standards
National Board of Fire Underwriters & United Fire Underwriters In America
By Henry Morton & WM. A. Anderson, New York Board of Fire Underwriters
Includes Standard Requirements of the New York Board of Fire Underwriters
Adopted January 12, 1882 (new upload of entire volume)
Download / View
(12.8 MB)
1892
Electric Lighting Specifications
For The Use Of Engineers And Architects By E. A. Merrill
©1892 Published First Edition
Contains Three Codes - Rules of the National Electric Light Association, Rules of the National Board of Fire Underwriters, Rules of the New England Insurance Exchange
1893
Electricity As A Fire Hazard
W. J Jenks - General Electric Company - Read Before The Worlds
Fire Insurance Congress At The June 1893 Exposition In Chicago
Notes & quotes the first Underwriters Code in 1881 on page 16
1884
J. A. Berly's Universal Electrical Directory and Advertiser
The Electricians Vade Mecum - A Complete Record of All The Industries
Directly or Indirectly Connected With Electricity And Magnetism - 1884
Publishes New York Board Fire Underwriters Code Jan 12, 1882 (page 237)
Download / View
(45.3 MB)
1895
The Architect's And Builder's Pocket-Book
Of Mensuration, Geometry, Geometrical Problems, Trigo Nometrical Formulas And Tables. Strength And Stability Of Foundations, Walls, Buttresses, Piers, Arches, Posts, Ties, Beams, Griders, Trusses, Floors, Roofs, etc.
By Frank Eugene Kidder - 12th Edition ©1892 Edition 1895
Contains January, 1894 Rules And Requirements On Page 675
Download / View
(38.5 MB)
1895
The Electrical Transmission Of Energy
A Manual for the Design of Electrical Circuits - Arthur Vaughan Aboott
First Edition ©1895
Mixed Rules from National Electric Light Association, National Board Of Fire Underwriters and New England Insurance- Page 125
Download / View
(19.2 MB)
1896
The National Electrical Code
An Analysis And Explanation Of The Underwriters Electrical Code
Pierce & Richardson - Hewitt (Fire Underwriters 1896 Code Edition in Appendix)
1896
New Catechism Of Electricity
A Practical Treatise
By - N. Hawkins, M.E. ©1896 Published 1897
Contains 1895 Rules And Requirements (undated) on page 374
Download / View
(10.4 MB)
1896
Electric Lighting Specifications
For The Use Of Engineers And Architects By E. A. Merrill
©1892 & ©1896 Published 1896 Second Edition - Entirely Rewritten
Rules And Requirements Edition Of Jan. 1, 1895 on page 154
1896
Electric Wiring Specifications
For Incandescent Lighting By George H. Kimber - 1896
Page 39 has partial 1895 code
1897
Historical Sketch Of The American Society of Civil Engineers
By Charles Warren Hunt
1897 -- New York
1901
Electric Lighting
A Practical Exposition Of The Art
VOL II - Distributing System And Lamps - By Francis B. Crocker
©1901& ©1906 Published 1806 Sixth Edition
NEC Edition Of 1901 on page 451
Download / View
(11.9 MB)
1901
Electrical Engineer's Pocket-Book
A Hand-Book of Useful Data For Electricians and Electrical Engineers.
By Horatio A. Foster - New York D. Van Nostrand Company 1901
NEC Edition Of 1901 on page 762
Download / View
(34.6 MB)
1906
The Elements Of Electrical Engineering
A Text Book for Technical Schools And Colleges By William Suddards Franklin
And William Esty Volume I - Direct Current Machines And Electric Lighting
Contains undated 1905 NEC on page 220
Download / View
(20.4 MB)
1907
The Electrical Transmission Of Energy
A Manual for the Design of Electrical Circuits - Arthur Vaughan Aboott
Rewritten - Fifth Edition ©1907 Preface 1895 - Preface 1898 Preface 1904
Undated NEC - Page 173
Download / View
(21.8 MB)
1908
Handbook For Architects And Builders
The Chicago Architects Business Association 1908 Printing
Includes Many Different Codes - March 1905 Revised Code for Chicago on page 201
Also a lot of local Chicago advertising all through the book
Download / View
(29.1 MB)
1912
Electric Lighting
And Miscellaneous Applications Of Electricity
By - William Suddards Franklin - 1912
Page 74 has some nec code from 1911

NEC Related Meetings
March 18, 19, 1896
Minutes of the First Meeting of the
National Conference On Standard Electrical Rules
NEC Section Only Entire Meeting
August 18, 1897
American Institute - Vol. XIV
The National Electrical Code As Adopted By
The National Conference on Standard Electrical Rules
New York, March 18th and 19th, 1896
NEC Section Only Entire Meeting
Sept. 29, 1897
American Institute - Vol. XIV
September 29, 1897 Report on the National Electrical Code
By Francis B. Crocker Pages 513 to 546
NEC Section Only Entire Meeting
December 3, 1897
American Society - Vol. XIX
New York Meeting November 30th to December 3rd 1897
December 2nd C. J. H. Woodbury Report Pages 10 & 33 to 35
NEC Section Only Entire Meeting
December 3, 1897
American Society - Vol. XIX
New York Meeting November 30th to December 3rd 1897
December 2nd Appendix - Report Of The National Conference On Standard Electrical Rules 1896 NEC
NEC Section Only Entire Meeting

The American Society of Mechanical Engineers
November 30th - December 3rd 1897 Meeting
Entire Meeting NEC Section Only
American Institute of Electrical Engineers Entire Meeting NEC Section Only
National Electric Light Association Entire Meeting NEC Section Only
American Institute of Electrical Engineers January - December 1899
Committee on Standardization Report - Approved June 26th 1899
Entire Meeting NEC Section Only
The American Society of Mechanical Engineers 1902-03 Meetings
Amendments To The National Electrical Code June 1st 1903
Entire Meeting NEC Section Only


Miscellaneous
Related Material

1889
The National Electric Light Association
August 6, 7 and 8, 1889
Download / View
(35.0 MB)
1895
Proceedings Of The National Board Of Fire Underwriters
29th Annual Meeting
Thursday, May 9, 1895
1913
Official Record - First American National Fire Prevention Convention
Including all papers and discussions; 1913 report of Fire Marshal for Philadelphia, with 1912 and 1913 reports of Philadelphia Fire Prevention Commission; 1914 report of fire waste committee, Chamber of Commerce of the USA, etc., etc.
Download / View
(37.6 MB)
1914
Board Of Public Utility Commissioners - NJ Vol. II
Reports - June 9, 1913 to May 12, 1914
Many Different Company Reports - Also Electrical Standards Page 275
Download / View
(15.1 MB)
1915
Transactions Of The International Engineering Congress, 1915
Sessions Held Under The Auspices Of
American Society of Civil Engineers
American Institute of Mining Engineers
The American Society of Mechanical Engineers
American Institute of Electrical Engineers
The Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers
September 20-25, 1915

The Index files below ARE contained in the full volumes.

They are only added here as an extra file, so that you can view an index and view it before downloading the entire volume.

This can save some time if you are only looking to research individual topics.


The American Institute of Electrical Engineers
Complete Records of Meetings

1886 Volume May-June-VOL-III - Index Only
1888 Volume November-October-VOL-VI - Index Only
1892 Volume January-December-VOL-IX - Index Only
1893 Volume January-December-VOL-X - Index Only
1894 Volume January-December-VOL-XI - Index Only
1895 Volume January-December-VOL-XII - Index Only
1896 Volume January-December-VOL-XIII - Index Only
1897 Volume January-December-VOL-XIV - Index Only
1898 Volume January-December-VOL-XV - Index Only
1899 Volume January-December-VOL-XVI - Index Only
1900 Volume January-December-VOL-XVII - Index Only
1901 Volume January-December-VOL-XVIII - Index Only
1902 Volume January-July-VOL-XIX - Index Only
1902 Volume July-December-VOL-XX - Index Only
1903 Volume January-June-VOL-XXI - Index Only
1903 Volume July-December-VOL-XXII - Index Only
1904 Volume January-December-VOL-XXIII - Index Only
1905 Volume January-December-VOL-XXIV - Index Only
1906 Volume January-December-VOL-XXV - Index Only
1907 Volume January-May-VOL-XXVI-Part-I - Index Only
1907 Volume June-December-VOL-XXVI-Part-II - Index
1908 Volume January-June-VOL-XXVII-Part-I - Index
1908 Volume June-December-VOL-XXVII-Part-II - Index

1909 Volume January-June-VOL-XXVIII-Part-I - Index
1909 Volume June-December-VOL-XXVIII-Part-II - Index
1910 Volume January-May-VOL-XXIX-Part-I - Index
1910 Volume May-December-VOL-XXIX-Part-II - Index
1911 Volume April-June-VOL-XXX-Part-II - Index Only
1911 Volume January-April-VOL-XXX-Part-I - Index
1911 Volume June-December-VOL-XXX-Part-III - Index
1912 Volume January-June-VOL-XXXI-Part-I - Index
1912 Volume June-December-VOL-XXXI-Part-II - Index
1913 Volume January-May-VOL-XXXII-Part-I - Index
1913 Volume May-December-VOL-XXXII-Part-II - Index
1914 Volume January-June-VOL-XXXIII-Part-I - Index
1914 Volume June-December-VOL-XXXIII-Part-II - Index
1916 Volume January-June-VOL-XXXV-Part-I - Index
1916 Volume June-December-VOL-XXXV-Part-II - Index
1916 Volume June-December-VOL-XXXV-Part-III - Index
1917 Volume January-December-VOL-XXXVI - Index
1918 Volume January-June-VOL-XXXVII-Part-I - Index
1918 Volume July-December-VOL-XXXVII-Part-II - Index
1919 Volume January-June-VOL-XXXVIII-Part-I - Index
1919 Volume July-December-VOL-XXXVIII-Part-II - Index
1920 Volume January-June-VOL-XXXIX-Part-I - Index
1921 Volume January-December-VOL-XL - Index
(please help find any missing volumes)

The American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Complete Records of Meetings
1883 Volume VOL-05-V - Index Only
1884 Volume VOL-06-VI - Index Only
1885 Volume VOL-07-VII - Index Only
1886 Volume VOL-08-VIII - Index Only
1887 Volume VOL-09-IX - Index Only
1888 Volume VOL-10-X - Index Only
1889 Volume VOL-11-XI - Index Only
1890 Volume VOL-12-XII - Index Only
1891 Volume VOL-13-XIII - Index Only
1894 Volume VOL-16-XVI - Index Only
1895 Volume VOL-17-XVII - Index Only
1896 Volume VOL-18-XVIII - Index Only
1897 Volume VOL-19-XIX - Index Only
1898 Volume VOL-20-XX - Index Only
1899 Volume VOL-21-XXI - Index Only
1900 Volume VOL-22-XXII - Index Only
1902 Volume VOL-24-XXIV - Index Only
1903 Volume -VOL-25-XXV - Index Only
1904 Volume -VOL-26-XXVI - Index Only
1905 Volume -VOL-27 - Index Only
1906 Volume -VOL-28 - Index Only
1907 Volume -VOL-29 - Index Only
1908 Volume -VOL-30 - Index Only
1909 Volume -VOL-31 - Index Only
1911 Volume -VOL-33 - Index Only
1913 Volume -VOL-35 - Index Only
1914 Volume -VOL-36 - Index Only
1915 Volume -VOL-37 - Index Only
1916 Volume -VOL-38 - Index Only
1917 Volume -VOL-39 - Index Only
1918 Volume -VOL-40 - Index Only
1919 Volume -VOL-41 - Index Only
1920 Volume -VOL-42 - Index Only
(please help find any missing volumes)




The National Electric Light Association

The National Electric Light Association was formed in 1885 and published several books and other items pre 1921 such as: A monthly Bulletin that contained up-to-date facts and figures on the electrical industry; A small weekly periodical entitled Rate Research which gave the latest commission decisions with extracts from articles dealing with electric rates; The NELA Rate Book which came with three quarterly supplements which provided electric light and power rates for cities with over 25,000 in population; reports of committees presented at annual meetings which were presented in bound volumes at the start of each new year. If you can help fill in the section below, please let me know.


The National Electric Light Association
Directly Authored Material
1889
The National Electric Light Association
TENTH CONVENTION
Proceedings Volume VII
August 6, 7 and 8, 1889
Includes advertising included at the end of volume
View All
(35.0 MB)
1904
The National Electric Light Association
TWENTY-SEVENTH CONVENTION
Volume II - Question Box and Wrinkles
May 24th, 25th, 26th, 1904
Includes advertising included at the end of volume
View All
(21.7 MB)
1909
The National Electric Light Association
The Electrical Solicitors' Handbook
View All
(6.4 MB)
1910
The National Electric Light Association
Bulletin Volume IV August to July
1910-1911
View All
(55.0 MB)
1911
The National Electric Light Association
Question Box Revision
From 1902-1909
View All
(5.8 MB)
1914
The National Electric Light Association
Handbook On Overhead Line Construction
Presented At The Thirty-Seventh Convention June 1-5, 1914
View All
(21.1 MB)
1915
The National Electric Light Association
THIRTY-EIGHTH CONVENTION
June 7-11, 1915
Accounting Sessions
Includes advertising included at the end of volume
View All
(9.4 MB)
1912
The National Electric Light Association
Construction And Operating Accounts
Standard Classification
View All
(1.1 MB)
1912
The National Electric Light Association
Electrical Meterman's Handbook
By The Committee On Meters -
Released At June 10-13 Convention 1912
View All
(38.2 MB)
1912
The National Electric Light Association
ORNAMENTAL STREET-LIGHTING
A Municipal Investment And Its Return
View All
(2.6 MB)
1922
The National Electric Light Association
Government Owned and Controlled Compared With
Privately Owned and Regulated Electric Utilities
View All
(7.8 MB)

On April 30th 1866 At a board meeting of the New York Board of Fire Insurance Companies a committee of three was appointed to confer with other companies on the subject of rates and commissions. It was from this committee that the National Board Of Fire Underwriters sprang from. While the National Board of Fire Underwriters concerns in these early days was mostly with petroleum, kerosene and gasoline, the new electric era brought in new concerns. At first it seemed that electricity was going to be better and more safe. This was until some large fires had taken place and the dangers of electricity started becoming more well known. Early electric ARC lighting was used for lighting streets, and other outside lighting which did not cause that much of a threat. The year 1880 (Edison demonstrated the first electric light bulb in December of 1879), marks the year for Incandescent lighting. It took some time for incandescent lighting to catch on and start being used in more homes. Less then two years after incandescent lighting, came the first written electrical code. This was released by The New York Board of Fire Underwriters Oct. 19th, 1881. In the next coming couple years many more codes were adopted and books explaining the dangers of electricity started being published.


The National Board Of Fire Underwriters
Directly Authored And Related Material
1871
to
1876
Addresses As President of the National Board of Fire Underwriters
On Several Occasions By Henry A. Oakley
1871-1876
View All
(0.0 MB)
1872
to
1877
Reports of Thomas H. Montgomery
General Agent
National Board Of Fire Underwriters
September, 1872-April, 1877
View All
(7.4 MB)
1876
to
1877
Annual Report of the Committee On Statistics
Of The National Board 61 Fire Underwriters
1876-1877
View All
(8.1 MB)
1877
to
1878
Annual Report of the Committee On Statistics
Of The National Board Of Fire Underwriters
1877-1878
View All
(20.0 MB)
1872
The Fire Underwriters' Text-Book
By J. Griswold, General Agent
Insurance Monitor Office
1872
View All
(23.1 MB)
1904
to
1916
MODERN
Electrical Construction

A Reliable practical guide for the beginner in electrical construction showing the latest approved methods of installing work of all kinds according to the safty rules of the National Board Of Fire Underwriters
Henry C. Horstmann and Victor H. Tousley
Copyright 1904,1908,1911.1913,1916
View All
(23.1 MB)




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